WE ARE THE NIGHT (WIR SIND DIE NACHT)

WE ARE THE NIGHT (WIR SIND DIE NACHT)-Germany-96 Mins. 2010

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Karolina Herfurth as Lena

Karolina Herfurth as Lena

Nina Hoss as Louise

Nina Hoss as Louise

Jennifer Ulrich as Charlotte

Jennifer Ulrich as Charlotte

Anna Fischer as Nora

Anna Fischer as Nora

Directed by Dennis Gansel

Story by Dennis Gansel

Written by Jan Berger and Dennis Gansel

We Are the Night is your typical vampire movie in that it explores the same themes i.e. sex, immortality, immorality and hedonistic behavior that countless other films of the genre that are not called Twilight cover. It’s the story of three vampires, Louise, Charlotte and Nora, and their recruitment of Lena, a young pickpocket on the streets of Berlin, into the ranks of the un-dead. There are no male vampires in this movie, only females. The males were too stupid to co-exist and were killed off by the women. But then maybe I’m getting ahead of myself in this review. I’m a little drunk, don’t you know?

Lena is seduced by Louise, the leader, who is blonde, statuesque and doe-eyed. It’s clear that Louise is the one who turned Charlotte and Nora. It’s also clear that they have been vampires (a word that is never uttered) since at least the 18th century. Now, after Lena’s transformation is complete and she joins this ghastly trio the four of them take Berlin by storm racing in stolen cars and, in the case of Charlotte, putting out their cigarettes on their eyeballs to the chagrin of restaurant patrons. Life is good and hedonism is the life for them. It makes it sad because you know that there will be a final, albeit expected and somewhat predictable confrontation between Lena and Louise. There is that and the results may not be what you perceive them to be.

I was pleasantly surprised with We Are the Night. Yes, there are predictable moments but the film never ventures into Twilight territory and actually features some rather spectacular moments of action in between all the un-dead all-girl bloodsucking action. It took me nearly six months to watch the movie-I’ve had it on my Netflix queue for that long. My only complaint is that it’s dubbed in English instead of being presented in its original German with subtitles. But that’s a minor complaint. We Are the Night is well worth your time if you’re into that whole gorgeous female vampire cum action movie stuff. 

 

TRIVIA

The word “vampire” is not said once in the entire film.

Nina Hoss was always the first and only choice as Louise when Dennis Gansel wrote the script in 1999. She wanted the part from the get go. Karoline Herfurth had also been attached since the 90s but was too young to play Lena, the part Gansel wanted to give her. Instead he promised her the part of Nora. Due to the delay in production, however, Herfurth was old enough to play Lena when the film was finally green-lit.

According to Dennis Gansel, the vampires each represents a time in German history he thought where a high point Louise represents the late 1700’s, Charlotte the 1920’s and the golden age of German films and Nora the 1990’s after the fall of the Berlin wall.

Dennis Gansel had a cameo in the film, like he usually does, as a police officer. The scene was deleted. In the scene he had one line before his character got his throat viciously slashed by Louise.

Jennifer Ulrich wanted there to be as much blood as possible.

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Karolina Herfurth also appears in The Reader and Perfume: The Story of a Murderer.

Nina Hoss also appears in Barbara and Yella.

Jennifer Ulrich also appears in The Wave and The Cloud.

Anna Fischer also appears in The Dead and the Living.

 

A PERSONAL GHOST STORY FOR OCTOBER 10, 2013

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Hello again, ghost story fans! I promised that I would share my own personal ghost story and that is exactly what I am doing with today’s post. Check it out:

I was 13, maybe 14 years old when it first happened; which would be sometime in 1975-1976. My grandmother had passed away about a year before at the age of 97. Grandma was a strange sort, seeing as to how she took to wandering the house late at night, shuffling her slippers on the carpet. Don’t even get me started on the banana peels she would stuff in the heating vent in the floor in her bedroom. There were many times when I would be watching Chief Wahoo McDaniel chopping the snot out of some poor jobber on World Wide Wrestling late Saturday night only to look up and see Grandma, with her Albert Einstein hair and a washcloth in her mouth peering around the corner at me sitting on the couch. She nearly gave me a heart attack every time. I would always just say, “Go to bed, Grandma.” and she would moan and I would hear her feet shuffling as she made her way back to bed.

I’m going around the world with this story, but I am getting to the point. After Grandma died I moved into her old bedroom. Her room, and her bed, was way bigger than the previous one I was residing in. One Sunday night I was nearly asleep with my body turned toward the wall when I heard a familiar shuffling behind me. It’s just Grandma, I thought; I’ll tell her to go back to bed.

“Grandma, go back to bed.”

Now, there are two very important facts to consider here. One, Grandma had been dead for at least a year. Two, I was sleeping in her old bed. I heard a moan and more shuffling and you can imagine my surprise when I felt the bed push down behind me as if someone were indeed crawling into bed with me. You can imagine my even greater surprise when I felt them pressed up against me, back to back. As I stated earlier, I was facing the wall; needless to say I was too scared to turn over and see who or what had crawled into that bed with me. This was not the last time that this would happen. It went on for at least six months and then it stopped, cold. I have no idea why it stopped. I asked my parents about it and they looked at me as if I just grown a horn in the middle of my head. All I know is that, aside from the initial incident, I never felt afraid when it would happen; I figured Grandma would never hurt me while she was living and she never would while she was dead, either. That’s my ghost story and I’m sticking to it.

Do you have a personal ghost story to share? If you do, then by all means we want to hear it. ‘We’ meaning me and the people who read this blog. Send your story to:

writteninbloodjrm@gmail.com

Try to make it at least 100 words and remember to let me know whether or not you want your real name, or a nickname, to be used when the story is posted. I look forward to reading the accounts of your experiences. Take care…and stay scared.

THE SEMI-DAILY HORROR MOVIE QUOTE OF THE DAY-JUNE 17, 2013

From NEAR DARK featuring Adrian Pasdar as Caleb Colton and Lance Henriksen (pictured) as Jesse Hooker:

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Caleb:How old are you?

Jesse: Let’s put it this way: I fought for the South.

Caleb: South?

Jesse: We lost.

THE SEMI-DAILY HORROR MOVIE QUOTE OF THE DAY-JUNE 13, 2013

From FINAL DESTINATION and featuring Tony Todd as Bludworth:

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In death there are no accidents, no coincidences, no mishaps, and no escapes.

THE SEMI-DAILY HORROR MOVIE QUOTE OF THE DAY-MAY 30, 2013

From Motel Hell and featuring Rory Calhoun as Farmer Vincent Smith:

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THE SEMI-DAILY HORROR MOVIE QUOTE OF THE DAY-MAY 28, 2013

From The Silence of the Lambs and featuring Ted Levine as Jame Gumb aka ‘Buffalo Bill‘:

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THE SEMI-DAILY HORROR MOVIE QUOTE OF THE DAY-MAY 23, 2013

From SEVEN and featuring Richard Portnow as Dr. Beardsley and Michael Reid Mackay as Victor (Sin of Sloth)

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